Tuesday, 21 June 2016

THE WRITING LIFE - a great big scary decision!

So, major decision since my last post. After weeks of being stuck, hours upon hours upon hours of thinking so hard I thought my brain might explode, and more importantly, in-depth discussions with my agent, I have decided to put aside the novel I was working on (my fourth) and start something completely new. Arghhhhhhh!

I feel the need for a calming image here...

That's better. Now, a few deep breaths...

Okay, so yes, that's what I've decided. Altogether, I'd written about 70,000 words, 45,000 of which I really liked, although after chatting with my agent, I can see now that I've not quite shown my character on paper as she is in my head. That can be fixed. But what can't be fixed without extensive rewriting and rethinking, is the story - or lack of it - which is why I've decided to put this one side, possibly for a couple of years.

Those of you who read this blog regularly will know that What She Lost, my third novel which is out in January, caused me some serious problems and it too, required extensive rewriting – I think I rewrote around 75% to 80%, and it's now much nearer to the novel I had in my head when I started writing it.

Iris Murdoch said, 'every book is the wreck of the perfect idea' and that pretty much sums up my experience lately. It's so frustrating to have an idea that is close to your heart, to have something to say that you feel is important and not be able to say it in a truthful and engaging way. I'm now pleased with What She Lost, but it did require an enormous amount of work, which I was only able to embark on after my editor and agent read the first draft and we had a long, creative meeting to thrash out some of the difficulties.

This time, my agent has read a sizeable chunk of my draft and confirmed my biggest fear – there wasn't really enough to keep the reader turning the page. There are other problems too, of course, but I know how to fix those. The bigger issue is that my story just isn't strong enough at the moment. This is partly to do with the structure, the order in which events occur, but I think I've maybe come at the whole thing from the wrong angle.

If I'm honest, what I have is interesting characters and an interesting situation – but that ain't a story! So I need to do a lot more thinking in order to find a new way of approaching this novel. I've created a folder on my desktop into which I've put all my existing notes and drafts for that novel, and to which I will add whenever thoughts occur to me. In a couple of years from now, I hope to return to this character I love so much – I've called her Eunice Shaw – and create a story around her that I'll be proud of.

In the meantime, I'm in the very early stages of exploring a new idea. This time, on the advice of my agent, I'm going to attempt to write a detailed synopsis before I start writing. It's something I've tried (and failed) to do before, but now, having had the experience of going so massively wrong with two novels, I'm going to do my level best to find a more efficient approach.

I will, as always, keep you posted on my progress (or otherwise...).

In other news:

  • Both my existing novels, The Things We Never Said, and The Secrets We Left Behind, Are on special e-book promotion for the rest of this month (June 2016). The Things We Never Said is less than a bus fare at 99p, and The Secrets We Left Behind is 1.99 – less than a decent coffee! (Click links to buy) 

  • Workshops: the last in the current series of our How to Write a Novel workshops is on 23rd of July and there are still places available. It's just £40 for the whole day. This workshop will focus on how to get published – writing a synopsis, approaching agents, etc. We'll also look at traditional versus self-publishing. These workshops have been so popular that we've decided to run the whole programme again starting in September. Full details  here

Also, as I say from time to time, it's great when a reader takes the trouble to leave a review on Amazon or Goodreads – it helps authors enormously, and it really doesn't have to be very long. In fact, I've just received one of the nicest short reviews I've ever had:

This book captured the modern day and the 60s beautifully. It captured everything perfectly. I don't remember many authors names, I will remember Susan Elliot Wright.

Isn't that lovely? Thank you, dear reader.


8 comments:

  1. It takes courage, putting a book to bed for a while, letting it sleep until the righ time for it to come to life. But it does sound like the right thing to do - good for you.

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    1. Thanks Jo. It might need quite a long sleep!

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  2. I feel your pain Susan! But I'm also excited about the new ideas waiting to be discovered and explored and confident that something wonderful will come from this tough decision. Onwards!

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    1. Thanks Iona! I'm sure I'll feel excited soon, but at the moment I'm waiting for the trauma to subside! As you say, onwards, ever onwards...

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  3. Hi Susan, Just happened across your blog via Book Connectors. Wishing you the very best of luck with your new novel - that was a very brave decision you made. I love the sound of The things we never said and The Secrets we left behind - will check them out!

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    1. Thanks so much, Rebecca – I need lots of luck, I think! Hope you get round to checking out the first two – and that you like them, obvs!

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  4. Knowing the results you achieved with the previous books, probably this "break" is for the best. I'm sure it'll be a bestseller one day - and it does not really matter when that day will come, not at the moment. Best of luck with the new project... one word at a time, Rome wasn't built in a day! ;-)

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    1. Thank you so much, Juana. That's what I keep telling myself – time to let the idea 'ripen', then one word at a time until I have a book.

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