Thursday, 18 February 2016


I'm a little behind with blogging at the moment. There's no good reason, no excuses, I just haven't made myself sit down and get on with it. It's certainly not that I don't have anything to say, and when I leave it this long I end up having too much to say, so I'll try not to waffle...

My 'Writing Life' since my last post has been quite good fun. I've given a talk to the Creative Writing MA students at Leeds Trinity, I ran a Planning and Plotting workshop with fellow writer Russell Thomas which, if the evaluation sheets are anything to go by, was a huge success, and I've had some very productive coffee shop writing days as well. I'm working on my fourth novel and really enjoying it, despite the fact that there are huge chunks of the story that I haven't worked out yet. The current word count is 37,000. This hasn't changed much since I last blogged, but that's because I've done a lot of rethinking and cutting as well as new writing. I'm pushing on now, though, and hope to boast a more impressive word count in a couple of weeks.

As for book 3, which is due for publication in January 2017, I'm waiting for my editor's final (I hope!) comments. I'm fairly sure there's not much to do now, just some tweaking here and there. I hope to be able to announce the title very soon!

I focus exclusively on fiction now, but was previously a magazine journalist and in that capacity I wrote a number of books on health-related matters. I'm delighted to announce that new, updated editions of two of those books – the two that I'm most proud of for reasons I'll come to in a moment – are being published today by Sheldon Press. These are  Overcoming Emotional Abuse and When Someone You Love Has Dementia

Overcoming Emotional Abuse has particular significance for me because I was in an emotionally abusive marriage for 12 years. I should make the point here (as I do in the book) that it's not only women who suffer this type of abuse. It does seem to affect more women than men, though - or at least, more women have begun to recognise it.Writing the book was cathartic for me. I included some details of my own experience but was quite shocked at the level of response to my request for case studies. So many women who'd experienced this type of abuse came forward that I couldn't include every story.

Anyone who is following the current Archers storyline will have some idea of what I mean by emotional abuse. Physical abuse is obvious to those being abused, if not to those around them. But emotional and psychological abuse is harder to acknowledge. The abuser wears down the victim by eroding confidence and self-esteem, isolating them from friends and family and controlling every aspect of their lives from where they go to who they see, how they spend their money, what they wear, what they eat and even when they sleep. People suffering this type of abuse will have become convinced that it's their own fault, that if only they weren't so stupid, clumsy, lazy, ugly, paranoid, tarty, sexually promiscuous/inhibited, everything would be all right.

When I escaped my abusive marriage in 1990, there was no law against stalking (my ex stalked me for three years after I left). It was good to see anti-stalking legislation introduced in 1997. When the first edition of the book was published in 2007, there was no law against emotional or psychological abuse. You had to wait for physical violence before the perpetrator could be prosecuted. (This type of abuse often progresses to physical violence, and all physical domestic abuse begins with emotional or psychological abuse.) I heartily welcome the new law against controlling and coercive behaviour which came into effect at the end of last year. It's a shame it was too late for me.

When the book first came out, I received a handful of letters from women who had found it helpful. I hope it will continue to help anyone suffering this type of abuse, and I'm so glad that the new law and the Archers storyline are both helping to raise awareness of this subject.

I don't have quite such a personal connection with When Someone You Love Has Dementia, although I'm proud of it because it was well reviewed and because it won a 'highly commended' in the BMA medical book awards 2010. In 2015, it was also chosen as part of the Reading Well Books on Prescription scheme.

So far, I'm happy to say that none of my loved ones has suffered from dementia, but I have a number of friends whose parents have this devastating disease. When writing the book, I interviewed people with dementia and their family members, and I was so affected by what I heard that I decided I wanted to further explore the subject in fiction. My third novel includes a dementia storyline.

Until quite recently, dementia was little talked-about and the research was massively underfunded. There is still a long way to go on both counts, but funding is improving, and we're certainly talking about the subject more these days, thanks to high profile sufferers like the late Sir Terry Pratchett, and to some fantastic novels, such as Elizabeth is Missing, by Emma Healey, Still Alice, by Lisa Genova, and The Memory Book, by Rowan Coleman.

Told you this might be long...

Final word: I'm running a series of 1-day How to Write a Novel workshops with Russ Thomas in Sheffield. The second one is this Saturday, 20th February - now full. But the others may be of interest! Only £40 for the day - bargain! Full details here

If you'd like to keep an eye on what I'm up to, visit my website, like my Facebook page or follow me on twitter

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